Archive:

Tags

Our BlogFacebook
Twitter

 American Dental Association
 

International Congress of Oral Implantologists

 

Posts for: February, 2018

By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
February 22, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   tooth erosion  
DontLettheAcidinSportsandEnergyDrinksRuinYourToothEnamel

Sports and energy drinks — two different types of popular beverages. But though different they have one thing in common: they can both wreak havoc on your tooth enamel.

That's because each contains high concentrations of acid. And acid is tooth enamel's mortal enemy — prolonged exposure with it causes the minerals in enamel to soften and erode, a process called de-mineralization.

Demineralization becomes even more pronounced when the mouth's pH levels fall below 4.0 into the acidic range. A sampling of various brands of sports and energy drinks reveal mean pH levels below even that threshold. Energy drinks are especially harmful to enamel because the type of acid they contain is more concentrated.

So, what can you do to minimize this threat to your dental health? The optimal thing to do is avoid such beverages altogether, especially energy drinks. If you currently re-hydrate after hard work or exercise with sports drinks, consider switching to water, nature's hydrator.

If you do, however, continue to drink these beverages, then follow a few precautions to lessen the acidic levels in your mouth:

Wait until mealtimes. Saliva is your body's way of neutralizing acid in your mouth, but it takes about 30 to 60 minutes for it to fully buffer acid. If you're sipping between meals on acidic beverages, saliva can't keep up. So, wait until you eat or limit your sipping time on a drink.

Rinse with water. Since water's pH is neutral, swishing some in your mouth right after drinking a sports or energy drink will help reduce acidity.

Wait an hour to brush. Your enamel will begin demineralizing as soon as it encounters acid. If you brush right away you could be sloughing off miniscule amounts of softened minerals. By waiting an hour you give your saliva time to buffer and help re-mineralize the enamel.

Although popular, especially among teenagers and young adults, overindulgence in sports and energy drinks could damage your teeth and increase your risk for tooth decay. With a little moderation and common sense, you can keep your enamel strong and healthy.

If you would like more information on the effects of sports and energy drinks on dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Think Before you Drink.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
February 14, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  

Would you like to avoid cavities and keep your breath fresher? Improving your oral hygiene habits can help. Our Kissimmee, Orlando, and oral hygieneHunter's Creek, FL area dentist, Dr. Adel Mansour, shares a few ways you can take your oral hygiene routine to the next level.

Spend more time brushing

How much time do you spend brushing your teeth? If you get the job done in 30 seconds, you're probably leaving plaque behind on your teeth. The sticky film causes cavities and also contributes to bad breath. If plaque remains on your teeth for as little as a week, it may turn into tartar, a deposit that's so hard that you can't remove it at home. Unsightly tartar irritates your gums and may cause gum disease if it isn't removed during a dental cleaning in our Kissimmee, Orlando, and Hunter's Creek area office.

Protect your smile by devoting at least two minutes to brushing your teeth. Hold your brush at a 45-degree angle and gently clean the front and back of each tooth with a circular motion to remove plaque and tartar build-up.

Make flossing a priority

No matter how well you brush your teeth, you may still develop cavities if you don't floss. In addition to coating the front and back sides of teeth, plaque and tartar also forms in between teeth. Flossing daily removes plaque and food debris that can contribute to bad breath.

Follow up with mouthwash

Mouthwash may help you avoid tooth decay if you choose a type that offers anti-cavity production. The product kills bacteria in your mouth that can cause cavities. Read labels carefully when you choose mouthwash. Products that contain alcohol can irritate or dry your mouth. Because dry mouth is a factor in bad breath, you may actually worsen your breath if you choose an alcohol-based product.

Avoid sticky candy

Sugary candy isn't good for your health or your teeth, but it's not always so easy to avoid temptation. If you do indulge in candy occasionally, choose a treat that isn't sticky. After you eat a caramel or handful of gummy bears, tiny pieces of the sugary candy remain stuck to your teeth until the next time your brush. Sticky, acidic candy is even worse for your smile. Sticky candies that are labeled sour not only expose your mouth to sugar for hours, but may also weaken your tooth enamel.

Good oral hygiene and regular check-ups can help keep your smile healthy. If it's time for your next exam, call our Kissimmee, Orlando, and Hunter's Creek, FL, area dentist, Dr. Mansour, at (407) 483-9990 to schedule an appointment.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
February 14, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   fluoride  
KeepYourBabysFluorideIntakewithinModerateLimits

Like many other families, you may use formula instead of breast milk as a safe and healthy alternative to feed your infant. But, if you use a powdered form that you mix with water your child may be taking in more fluoride than they require.

Fluoride is a natural chemical that can strengthen tooth enamel and help prevent decay. After decades of study it's also been shown to pose no serious health risks. Because of fluoride's benefits and safety, many water utilities add tiny amounts to their drinking water supply.

But it can have one side effect called enamel fluorosis. If a child ingests too much fluoride during early development it can cause discoloring mottled spots or streaking in permanent teeth. Although it doesn't affect their health, the teeth can be unattractive and require cosmetic attention.

That's why it's best to keep fluoride consumption to a healthy minimum for children. That, however, is often easier said than done, since we can encounter hidden fluoride in a variety of places. Besides hygiene products and fluoridated drinking water, you may find fluoride in prepared juices and other beverages, bottled water or in foods processed with fluoridated water. There are no labeling requirements for fluoride, so you'll have to research to find out if a product contains fluoride.

There are, however, some things you can do to control your child's fluoride intake. First, know as much as you can about known sources your child may encounter like your water supply. You can find out if your utility adds fluoride and by how much by contacting them or visiting My Water's Fluoride online at https://nccd.cdc.gov/DOH_MWF/.

If you use fluoride toothpaste apply only a “smear” on the end of the brush for children under two and a pea-sized amount for older children. If you have fluoridated drinking water, consider breastfeeding your infant, use ready-to-feed formula or mix powdered formula with bottled water labeled “de-ionized,” “purified,” “demineralized” or “distilled.”

And, do feel free to discuss your concerns with us during your child's regular checkup. We'll help you adjust their diet, water intake and hygiene habits to be sure they're receiving the right amount they need for developing strong teeth — and no more.

If you would like more information on appropriate fluoride levels for children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Development and Infant Formula.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
February 06, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
TakeTheseMeasurestoLowerYourChildsToothDecayRisk

As a parent you’re always on the lookout for dangers to your toddler’s well-being: sharp corners on furniture, uneven walks or the occasional stomach bug. But a situation could be brewing in their mouth you might not be aware of until it’s become a full-blown problem.

The silent danger is tooth decay, which could be developing as early as infancy. Undiagnosed and untreated, it could ultimately cause premature loss of primary (“baby”) teeth with adverse effects on the eruption of incoming permanent teeth.

Tooth decay arises from certain strains of mouth bacteria, often passed down from parent to child. These bacteria produce acid as a byproduct after feeding on carbohydrates (especially sugars). The more food available, the more acid they produce. This wreaks havoc on tooth enamel, the teeth’s outer protective covering by softening and dissolving its mineral content. This gives decay an opening to infect the interior of a tooth.

Combine inadequate hygiene practices (especially brushing) with poor dietary habits, and you have the conditions for a perfect disease storm in your child’s mouth. That’s why you should begin oral hygiene as soon as you notice their first teeth. Wiping them with a clean, wet cloth is sufficient in the beginning, but you should start daily brushing (with fluoridated toothpaste to strengthen young enamel) by their first birthday.

You should also practice good dietary habits. For example, avoid giving an infant or toddler a bottle filled with juice, milk or formula to sleep with through the night — the constant sipping bathes the mouth in sugars bacteria feed on. Instead, use plain water. You should also focus on nutrition from the get-go to help build overall good health as well as strong teeth and gums.

As an added measure, begin regular dental visits by their first birthday. A checkup and cleaning every six months will help us detect early tooth decay and lessen its impact. We can also provide sealants and topical fluoride to give added protection against decay.

Catching and treating decay early before it gets too far is the best way to prevent early tooth loss. Your child’s future dental health might depend on it.

If you would like more information on your child’s dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Taking the Stress out of Dentistry for Kids.”