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Posts for: May, 2015

By Central Florida Cosmetic and Family Dentistry
May 28, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental EmergenciesIf you’ve ever experienced a dental emergency, you know just how anxious it can make you. Whether you’ve had a tooth knocked out, broken your dental appliance, or experienced a severe toothache, you will need an emergency visit to your Hunters Creek dentist. Not only can an emergency visit with a dental professional save you from a lot of pain and discomfort, it could also save your smile.

Reasons for Emergency Dental Visits

Lost tooth: If your tooth is knocked out, it may be saved if you can locate the tooth and get it to your dentist as quickly as possible. First, clean the tooth with water to remove any debris. Then try to reinsert the tooth into the socket until you can see your dentist. If you cannot reinsert the tooth, keep it in a cup of cold milk to transport it to your dental professional.

Orthodontic Emergencies: While wearing braces can be a bit uncomfortable in the beginning, the discomfort should lesson over time. In some cases, patients may break a bracket or have a wire come loose, which should be addressed by your Hunters Creek dentist as soon as possible.

Tooth Pain: A tooth that has been damaged either by injury or by decay can begin to ache. If the tooth becomes infected, you may experience unbearable pain that can radiate through the jaw. In these cases, it’s important to see your Hunters Creek emergency dentist as soon as possible, not only to relieve the pain but also to try to save the tooth and jaw from further infection and damage. You may need a root canal, or possibly an extraction in severe cases.

Gum Infections: If your gum develops a periodontal abscess or an infection, your dentist will need to clean the infected area and control the infection to avoid tooth loss and more serious problems. Untreated periodontal disease can cause infection to spread to other parts of your body, raising the risk for heart disease. If you feel swelling on your gums, contact your Hunters Creek dental professional immediately.

If you experience a dental emergency, contact Dr. Adel Mansour of Central Florida Cosmetic and Family Dentistry in Hunters Creek for a consultation. Schedule your visit by calling (407) 483-9990.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
May 25, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   medications  
DoYouNeedAntibioticsBeforeHavingaDentalProcedure

Many people have questions about the proper use of antibiotics — especially today, as the overuse of these medications has become a concern. It isn’t necessary for most people to take antibiotics before having a dental procedure. But for a few — notably, those with particular heart conditions and, in some cases, joint replacements — pre-medication is advisable. The question may be even more confusing now, because the standard recommendations have recently changed — so let’s try and sort things out.

First, why would anyone need antibiotics before dental treatment? Essentially, it’s because of the chance that an open wound could allow bacteria from the mouth to enter the bloodstream. For people in good health, the body is capable of quickly containing and neutralizing the bacterial exposure. But people with some types of heart disease, heart transplants, and/or total joint replacements have a greater likelihood of developing a bacterial infection, which can be dangerous — or even life-threatening. The same may be true of people whose immune systems are compromised.

At one time, people with a broad range of heart problems and artificial joints were advised to pre-medicate; today, new research indicates that fewer people need to take this step. Antibiotics are currently recommended before dental procedures if you have:

  • An artificial heart valve, or a heart valve repaired with artificial material
  • A history of endocarditis
  • A heart transplant with abnormal heart valve function
  • Cyanotic congenital heart disease (a birth defect where blood oxygen levels are lower than normal) that hasn’t been fully repaired — including children with surgical shunts and conduits
  • A congenital heart defect that has been completely repaired with artificial material or with a device — but only for the first six months after the repair procedure
  • Repaired congenital heart disease with residual defects, such as leakage or abnormal flow

In addition, not everyone who has an artificial joint needs antibiotic premedication. Instead, your health care providers will rely on your individual medical history to determine whether this step is required in your situation. However, having a compromised immune system (due to diabetes, cancer, arthritis, chemotherapy and other factors) is still an indication that antibiotics may be needed.

The question of whether or not to pre-medicate is an important one — so it’s vital that you share all relevant medical information with your doctors and dentists, and make sure everyone is in the loop. That way, the best decisions can be made regarding your treatment.

If you have questions about premedication before dental treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
May 24, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
CosmeticQuestionstoAsktoGetYouontheRightPathtoaBetterSmile

For some time now, you’ve noticed things about your teeth and gums — your overall smile — that you would like to change. But you’re in unfamiliar territory: you don’t know where to begin.

Here, then, are a few basic cosmetic dentistry questions you should ask yourself and us to get you moving in the right direction.

Am I a candidate for cosmetic dentistry? Invariably, the answer is yes — there’s always a way to enhance your appearance, starting with basic hygiene or whitening. But whether you’re a candidate for a particular procedure will depend on a full examination of your mouth — a “smile analysis” — to assess its current condition and needs, and what cosmetic options would best fit those needs.

Are my expectations realistic? That will first depend on what we find with your smile analysis. It will, however, also include studying the bigger picture — how certain changes might affect not only your smile but your overall facial appearance. Your wants and desires are extremely important in this process, but they should also be balanced with a dose of reality — some things may not be in your best interest health-wise to undertake, or are not in keeping with basic aesthetic principles of beauty.

Will I be able to have an idea beforehand how the changes will look? We’ve come a long way in providing patients ways to preview their new smile before undertaking a procedure. It’s often possible to “see” your proposed smile through computer simulation, or in some cases “test drive” it with temporary (provisional) crowns or veneers. For restorations involving porcelain crowns, it may be possible to take your input and fine-tune the shape and color of the permanent crown before it’s completed.

What will it cost? This will depend on the treatment plan we develop. Some treatments like teeth whitening are relatively inexpensive, while procedures like dental implants or orthodontics are major investments. You should also consider the costs to your time — some treatments require only a single visit, while others may take months or even years to complete. Depending on your financial means and comfort level, cost will need to be factored into the final plan, as well as your expectations.

If you would like more information on cosmetic dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry: A Time for a Change.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
May 16, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmd   tmj   tmj disorders  
AClearDiagnosisofJawPainisNeededtoDeterminetheRightTreatment

A blow to the face can result in a variety of injuries to your jaws and the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) that join the lower jaw to the skull. Only a thorough examination can determine the type and extent of the injury, and how to treat it.

The pain you feel in your jaw may indicate a direct injury, usually near the joint. This could mean the joint head (condyle) has dislocated, or moved out of the joint space. It could also mean you’ve fractured your lower jaw, most commonly just below the head of the joint.

Jaw pain can also indicate structures near the jaw and joint have been damaged and the jaw is indirectly affected. In some cases a damaged tooth may be radiating pain signals through the jaw (along similar nerve paths). More likely, trauma to soft tissue near the jaw joint has swelled with inflammation, putting pressure on the joint and temporarily stopping the condyle from seating fully in the joint space.

Any of these injuries can also cause painful muscle spasms, a defensive reaction from the body that causes muscles on either side of the jaw to limit movement preventing further damage (a natural splint, if you will). Thus, the pain may be compounded by a diminished range of motion when you try to chew or speak.

It’s important, therefore, to determine the exact cause of pain and limited movement before commencing treatment. Spasms and inflammation are usually treated with muscle relaxant drugs and anti-inflammatory pain relievers. In the case of a dislocation, gentle manipulation can ease the condyle back into the joint space. A fracture would require more extensive treatment, including repositioning broken bone and immobilizing the jaw from movement to allow healing. In the most severe cases, surgical treatment may be necessary to internally immobilize the joint.

If you sustain an injury that results in jaw swelling and pain, you should see us without delay. The sooner we can diagnose and begin the proper treatment for your injury, the less likely you’ll encounter long-term problems and the sooner you’ll be pain and swelling free.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatment of jaw pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Jaw Pain.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
May 08, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
UsingSinusSurgerytoStimulateBoneGrowthforImplants

For a predictable outcome, a dental implant should be placed as soon as the bone and gum tissues following a tooth extraction have healed. But what happens if the tooth has been missing for months or years? You might then run the risk of not having enough bone to properly place an implant.

This can happen because of a disruption in the growth cycle of living bone tissue. As older bone cells dissolve (resorption), new bone develops to take its place. This is a dynamic process, as the amount and exact location of the new growth is in response to changes in the mouth, particularly from forces generated by the teeth as we chew. If, however, this stimulation transmitted to the bone no longer occurs because the tooth is missing, the bone will tend to dissolve over time.

In fact, within the first year after a tooth loss the associated bone can lose as much as a quarter of its normal width. This is why we typically place bone grafting material in an empty socket at the same time as we extract the tooth. This encourages bone growth during the healing period in anticipation of installing a dental implant or a fixed bridge. If, however, the bone has diminished to less than required for a dental implant, we must then use techniques to encourage new bone growth to support a future implant.

One such technique for restoring bone in the back of the upper jaw is to surgically access the area through the maxillary sinus (a membrane-lined air space within the bone structure of the face) positioned just over the jawbone to place grafting material. During surgery performed usually with local anesthesia, the surgeon accesses the sinus cavity, lifts the tissue membrane up from the sinus floor and applies the grafting material on top of the bone. Eventually, the new bone growth will replace the grafting material.

If successful, the new bone growth will be sufficient to support an implant. Thanks to this renewed growth, you’ll soon be able to enjoy better function and a transformed smile provided by your new implant.

If you would like more information on forming new bone for implants through sinus surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sinus Surgery.”