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Posts for: October, 2013

By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
October 29, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: veneers   prepless veneers  
No-PrepVeneersmaybeanOptionforSomePatients

Although traditional porcelain laminate veneers are much less invasive than other cosmetic dental applications, they still often require the removal of some of the surface tooth enamel, a process known as tooth reduction. Now, an alternative veneer treatment known as “no-prep” veneers eliminates this initial step of tooth reduction for some patients.

Although most reductions take very little of the tooth enamel, they do permanently alter the tooth. No-prep veneers are growing in popularity because the tooth is not permanently altered, allowing for two benefits: if desired, the veneer application can be reversed and the tooth returned to its original state; and there's more flexibility for patients to “test-drive” their new look with prototype veneers worn while the permanent veneers are manufactured, with changes made easily during this tryout period.

Dentists have long regarded at least a minimum of tooth reduction as absolutely necessary for the proper adhesion of veneers, and to avoid a bulky or over-contoured smile. And, while advances in no-prep veneers have largely addressed these concerns, it is true this option isn't for every patient considering a veneer application.

For example, patients with large or forward-positioned teeth are not good candidates for no-prep veneers. Patients who choose a veneer treatment over orthodontic treatment for certain conditions will likely need some tooth preparation to achieve an acceptable aesthetic result. For patients generally, no-prep veneers have a limited application range on the bottom jaw due to space limitations.

Simply put, traditional veneers are a more versatile option for most patients. On the other hand, no-prep veneers can be a good choice for patients with genetically small or misshapen teeth, teeth reduced by erosion or grinding, or those with narrow or diminished smiles.

If you're considering this option, our first step is to conduct a complete examination of your teeth and mouth. We'll carefully evaluate every aspect of your mouth structure and overall dental condition. If you fit the criteria, you may be able to avoid tooth reduction and still gain the smile you desire.

If you would like more information on no-prep veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers Without the Drill.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
October 21, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
FiveFactsAboutTooth-ColoredFillings

For decades, dental amalgam — the common “silver” fillings found in the mouths of millions — was the best option for restoring teeth after the removal of decay. This time-tested material is still going strong, but in recent years it's had serious competition from newer restoration techniques that use tooth-colored substances to make fillings. If you've heard of these new materials and want to know more, you can start with the following five facts.

1) Filling materials must match the properties of natural teeth.

When properly cared for, teeth are strong, resilient, and superbly functional. A good filling material should mimic the strength and durability of natural teeth under biting forces. It should also last a long time in the mouth, be relatively easy to place, and be economical in cost. In the past, amalgam fillings were the best choice to do the job. But that was then.

2) Tooth-colored filling materials offer similar benefits, plus aesthetic appeal.

Composite resins and dental porcelains are tough, durable materials that have been found to hold up well under years of use. Unlike traditional silver fillings, however, they match the appearance of natural teeth quite closely. This means that even a restoration in the front of the mouth may be virtually undetectable. And who wouldn't like that?

3) Tooth-colored resins may allow more conservative treatment in decay removal.

In order to keep them securely in place, amalgam (silver) fillings may require “undercutting,” which removes more of the tooth structure. The process involved in bonding tooth-colored restorations, however, generally requires removal of less tooth material. This means a stronger base for rebuilding the tooth's structure.

4) Different treatment methods are used for different degrees of tooth restoration.

Small cavities can be treated by direct “chairside” techniques, which are very similar to the methods used for traditional amalgam (silver) fillings: in one brief visit, it's all done. When a greater volume of tooth structure must be replaced, we may be able to create a larger tooth-colored filling in a longer visit. Or, we might need to have a special restoration made to match your teeth; then, you can come back to have it securely bonded for a natural and long-lasting result.

5) Both amalgam and tooth-colored fillings are safe and effective.

Each has advantages and disadvantages in particular cases. But as the technology of tooth-colored filling systems evolves, some dental researchers have heralded the beginning of the “post-amalgam era.” Are tooth-colored fillings right for your individual situation? We're the ones to ask.

If you would like more information about tooth-colored fillings, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
October 18, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
EndtheEmbarrassmentofStainedTeethwithWhitening

You have a beautiful smile, but you hesitate to show it because of your stained teeth. Fortunately, whitening techniques could take away that embarrassment.

There are two basic types of tooth staining or discoloration: extrinsic, in which the stain is on the surface of the teeth and mostly caused by substances like coffee, wine or tobacco; and intrinsic, which occurs deep within the tooth, caused by such factors as aging, previous dental treatments and fillings, the use of antibiotics (tetracycline, predominantly), or over-exposure to fluoride.

Whitening or bleaching is an effective and relatively affordable solution for many instances of both intrinsic and extrinsic staining. Bleaching solutions are available in over-the-counter (OTC) home kits or as a professional application in the dental office.

Most bleaching solutions use carbamide peroxide, a chemical compound that is effective in removing most stains. OTC home applications contain carbamide peroxide (or an equivalent) in concentrations of about 10% as opposed to 15-35% found in professional solutions. Though less costly than a professional application, OTC products take longer (usually up to three weeks) to achieve desired results. With its stronger solution, a professional application in our office can achieve the same level of brightness in only one or two visits. We may also use special lighting to accelerate the chemical process, as well as rubber dams or gels to protect gums and soft tissues from solution irritation during the procedure.

Although effective, whitening isn't a permanent solution — over time the effect will fade, usually six months to a year depending on how you care for your teeth. Matching tooth color can also be difficult in some cases, especially if you have a mix of natural teeth and artificial crowns or bridges. And, whitening may not be adequate for some types of staining.

Regardless of which application you wish to use — OTC or professional — it's a good idea to visit us first for a professional consultation. We can recommend whether whitening is a good choice for your particular type and level of staining, or if some other option like porcelain veneers might be the better choice. Regardless, there are solutions to the problem of staining, and a way to gain a brighter smile.

If you would like more information on bleaching, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Whitening.”


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
October 17, 2013
Category: Teeth Whitening
Tags: Whitening   Kissimmee  
Has that cup of Joe taken a toll on your smile’s vibrant color? Or maybe a sports injury knocked out or kissimmee teeth whiteningchipped a tooth? Whatever the reason, we understand that not having that perfect smile can cause anyone to be stressed or self-conscious. That’s why our Kissimmee cosmetic dentists at Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry are happy to sit down and talk with our patients to address each person’s dental needs and concerns. After all, we know how important a happy, healthy smile is.
 
From talking to your favorite barista as they make your morning cappuccino to leading a presentation in a room full of colleagues, the one thing that shouldn’t be on your mind is your smile. A smile is one of the first features we notice when talking to someone, and a great smile can be striking. Whether you want to brighten your teeth with a top-of-the-line whitening system or correct a crooked tooth with long-lasting dental veneers, we at Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry have established and friendly cosmetic dentists to cater to our Kissimmee clientele. Our Kissimmee cosmetic dentists are dedicated to providing the best cosmetic dentistry to our patients, and are happy to answer any questions or concerns you might have.
 
Stained, broken, or uneven teeth are no match for us. Our Kissimmee cosmetic dentists are ready to tackle any issues. We are confident that you’ll love your new smile. 
 
What are you waiting for? To find out if cosmetic dentistry is right for you and call us at (407) 483-9990.

By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
October 11, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
ProtectYourEnamelFromtheDamagingEffectsofAcid

One of your teeth's best defenses against tooth decay is its hard, outer layer made of a mineral-rich substance known as enamel. This great protector, however, has an enemy — acid — from the foods and drinks we consume as well as the acid byproducts from bacterial plaque. A high acidic level in the mouth could lead to the complete erosion of enamel, leaving teeth more susceptible to decay.

When the acid level in the mouth rises, calcium and other minerals in enamel become soft and begin to slough off, a process called de-mineralization. But the body can reverse this process with the help of saliva, which can neutralize acid. Saliva also contains calcium that can bind to the tooth surface and help replace what was lost during de-mineralization — a process known as re-mineralization. Saliva can normally accomplish this in thirty minutes to an hour after eating.

Unfortunately, saliva's neutralizing power can be overwhelmed when there is too much acid present. This occurs when we ingest substances like sodas or sports drinks that are high in citric acid. Many of these same beverages also have a high buffering capacity that slows the neutralizing effect of saliva. Ironically, we can also interrupt re-mineralization if we brush our teeth too quickly after eating or drinking something acidic. The enamel has been softened by the acid and when we brush before re-mineralization we can actually brush away some of the enamel.

There are some steps you can take to help this natural process for maintaining a healthy pH balance in the mouth. First, limit your intake of acidic foods and beverages. Drink water for rehydration, or at least acidic beverages enriched with calcium. If you do drink an acidic beverage use a straw to reduce acid contact with teeth, try not to swish it around in your mouth, and try to drink it during mealtime. Finally, wait 30 to 60 minutes before brushing your teeth after eating or drinking something acidic.

Tooth enamel is a key component in maintaining healthy teeth. Protecting this prime defense against decay will pay you dividends for many years to come.

If you would like more information on enamel erosion, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Erosion.”