Archive:

Tags

Our BlogFacebook
Twitter

 American Dental Association
 

International Congress of Oral Implantologists

 

Posts for: March, 2011

By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
March 28, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

Worldwide it is generally accepted that the best method for permanently replacing a missing tooth is with a dental implant. However, one fact that can affect the timing of placement of dental implants is that the person should be fully mature. In this case, it means that growth is complete, in particular the jawbones have completed growing. And while we are sensitive to teens who may beg for a dental implant to replace a missing, damaged or traumatized tooth, parents or caregivers should know that research and experience have shown that it is better to wait.

The main reason it is best to wait is because natural teeth grow and move with the jaws as they mature whereas implants don't. Natural teeth change positions and move with the jaws as the jaws grow, implants don't. They are fused to the bone in one position and as the jawbone grows, they get left behind and appear to sink as the adjacent teeth and jawbone grow in harmony.

Although it is not really possible to determine exactly when a person has finished growing, it is generally best to wait until the jaw is fully matured and developed. However, we are the most qualified, along with our orthodontic colleagues to “guesstimate” based on family history, age and genetics. Specialized radiographs (x-rays) of the skull and jaws may also be helpful in determining the timing of jaw growth completion and when implants can be placed.

Dental implants are a permanent solution to a dental problem and thus should not be used until all growth is complete. Think about it. Your young child gets a beautifully restored smile through a dental implant...and for a year or two it looks fantastic. However, as your child's jaws continue to grow, everyone begins to notice gaps between the implant and adjacent teeth. So it makes sense to avoid this eventuality; by just waiting until late teens when beautifully restored crowns on properly positioned dental implants should last for many many years.

To learn more on this subject, read the Dear Doctor article, “Teenagers & Dental Implants.” You are also welcome to contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
March 21, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  

Hearing the news that you need a root canal often causes anxiety for most people given all the bad press this procedure has received (e.g., “I'd rather have a root canal than...”). However, the truth is that root canal treatment relieves pain; it doesn't cause it. And it is typically highly successful. The real pain occurs for most people when decay is left untreated or the nerve in a tooth under a very large filling becomes infected and dies.

For these reasons, we have put together the following list of questions you should consider asking prior to having a root canal or endodontic (“endo” – inside: “dontic” – tooth) treatment.

  • Am I a good candidate for root canal treatment?
  • Does it hurt to have a root canal?
  • What can I expect if I do not have a root canal treatment?
  • Are there any other treatment options for me given my situation? If so, what are they?
  • Do you do root canal treatment or should I see a specialist?
  • How long will the entire process take from my first appointment until my root canal treatment has healed?
  • Will the pain I am in immediately subside after a root canal or will it take some time?
  • Will I need or receive any type of sedation while having the treatment?
  • Are there any risks associated with root canal treatment? If so, what are they?
  • How long can I expect my natural tooth to last after root canal treatment?
  • What could happen to cause a root canal to require a second treatment?
  • How much will my root canal cost?
  • Will my insurance cover all or a portion of the cost?
  • Will the tooth be as strong after root canal treatment, or will it need a crown?
  • Will there be any special maintenance required on an ongoing basis after I have a root canal?

To learn more about root canals, continue reading the Dear Doctor article, “I'd Rather Have A Root Canal.” Or if you feel you may need a root canal or other dental procedure, contact us today to schedule a consultation.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
March 21, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

It is always good to be prepared before you have any dental or medical procedure. Make sure that you are informed and know what to expect to make you as comfortable as possible. We recommend that you have a list of questions with you to ask us during your consultation. If we inform you that you need a crown, consider asking any or all of the following questions:

  • Am I a good candidate for a crown?
  • Can you do a computer-generated mock-up of my new smile with crowns? (This question is only applicable if the crown is for a front or visible tooth.)
  • Is there a way that I can “test-drive” my new smile and crown(s) before making them permanent?
  • How long will the entire process take from my first appointment through completion?
  • What are the risks, benefits and alternatives associated with the type of crown(s) you are recommending?
  • Is there any discomfort associated with crown procedures?
  • Will I need or receive any type of sedation when you prepare (drill) the tooth or teeth for a crown?
  • Is what you are recommending commonly done?
  • Can you show me some before and after photos of cases that you have done?
  • How much will my crown(s) cost?
  • Will my insurance cover all or a portion of the cost?
  • How long can I expect my crown(s) to last?
  • Will there be any maintenance required with my crown(s)?

To learn more about crowns, read the Dear Doctor article, “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.” Or you can contact us today to discuss your situation and schedule a consultation.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
March 14, 2011
Category: Oral Health

Your teeth were designed to last you a lifetime, so you should do everything you can to protect them. This includes guarding them against dental erosion. However, many people may not know for sure what dental erosion is, much less how or why they need to guard against it.

Dental or tooth erosion is the irreversible loss of tooth enamel from chemical attack by acids. Eating or sucking acidic foods such as lemons is a good example. But most people are shocked to discover that it can also be caused by their favorite sodas (carbonated beverages), natural fruit juices, energy and sports drinks — especially with excessive consumption. It takes the saliva, nature's protection, at least 30 to 60 minutes to neutralize the effects of acid, so only one acidic drink an hour causes your teeth to be continually bathed in acid. And this is an important fact to know, because if your mouth is acidic all the time, this will promote tooth decay.

Will brushing help out with prevention?

When it comes to dental erosion, brushing immediately after acid consumption can actually make it worse by accelerating the erosion process. This is because the acids in these drinks (and some foods) actually dissolves tooth enamel and softens the tooth surface. These newly softened surfaces can literally be brushed away if you brush before your saliva has a chance to try to reverse the process. If done often, you could even brush away your enamel! For this reason, you should wait at least 30 to 60 minutes before you brush your teeth after consuming any of these products.

So what can you do to prevent dental erosion?

One important step that you (and your family) can do to help prevent dental erosion is to limit the amount of these beverages you drink. Instead, try drinking calcium-rich milk or water and saving your favorite acidic beverage for a special treat that you consume preferably with a meal. Try reducing the number of these drinks you consume over a period of time. If you must drink an acidic beverage avoid swishing it in the mouth and use a straw to reduce the contact between the acid and your teeth.

Just remember that once your dental enamel has eroded, it is gone forever. So you should follow these simple tips now to protect your smile and future.


By Central Florida Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
March 07, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental crowns are excellent tools that we use to restore functionality, color and/or beauty to teeth and your smile. And while many people may have heard of them, often times there are many questions surrounding the process, costs and their maintenance. This is why we have put together this list of some of the questions we are commonly asked on this subject. Our goal is to provide you with straightforward answers so that you have a clearer understanding of the treatment and are comfortable making the decision to go forward with these excellent tooth restorations should they ever be required.

What Is A Crown?

A dental crown is a tooth-shaped “cap” or cover that a dentist places over a tooth that is badly damaged from trauma or decay in order to restore its color, strength, size and functionality. They are also used for cosmetic reasons to improve discolored or misshapen teeth.

Why Can The Cost Of Crowns Vary?

The reason the cost of a crown can vary greatly, even from dentist to dentist is quite simple. The most beautiful crowns require the artistry and years of experience of a team of dental professionals; your dentist and the laboratory technicians that handcraft crowns. To meet higher expectations of some individuals requires more experience, artistry and skill. And great art just tends to cost more. A customized temporary crown may even be used as a preview to see what a final crown will look like. Another critical factor is the choice of materials used. For example, while all porcelain crowns are made from high-quality ceramic (glass) material, they are not equal. It is therefore more expensive in terms of time, skill and expertise to produce the most natural looking results.

How Long Will A Crown Last?

Most dentists expect a crown to last at least 7-10 years with normal wear and proper maintenance. However, depending on the materials used and location of the tooth, they can last upwards of 50 years or more. For example, a gold crown has the longest lifespan because gold is such a durable material that has little to no negative impact on surrounding teeth. On the other hand, porcelain produces a completely natural look but can cause wear to adjacent teeth.

What Materials Are Most Often Used For Crowns?

The three most common materials used to make crowns are as follows:

  • Gold
  • Porcelain-Fused-to Metal (PFM)
  • All porcelain

To learn more on this topic, read the Dear Doctor article, “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.” You can also contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule a consultation.